This is exciting! It will save the problem on waste and our dependency on fossil fuel. And jets are the biggest gas-guzzler.

Im really happy to see that a lot of people are doing their part in finding the solution for us to counter climate change.  We can all do something from as little as unplugging those unused electronic devices to investing and innovating something as big as this.

The problem of climate change is really felt by so many people around the world.  Flooding, hurricanes, tsunami, snow storms, la-nina etc.  It’s scary but we can either be overwhelmed by fear or just do something about it.

 

 

 

———————-

Leftovers on the menu for jet fuel

Matt O’Sullivan
January 4, 2011 – 3:00AM

Advertisement

FOOD scraps and grass clippings could one day help fuel Qantas passenger jets.

But the airline has confirmed that its plans to convert rubbish into biofuel does not include harnessing the other, less appealing, form of human waste.

Qantas has taken its most tangible step towards reducing its carbon emissions by signing a deal with a US fuel producer, Solena, to consider constructing a trial plant near Sydney Airport to turn waste into biofuel.

The airline said it expected to complete a feasibility study for the waste-based aviation fuel plant within a year. Should it become feasible, the biofuel will be trialled on aircraft.

The waste considered as potential sources of biofuel includes food scraps, packaging and tree cuttings.

Qantas has been investigating the possibility of fuelling planes with biofuel for several years but the latest memorandum of understanding with Solena will kick-start its efforts to find alternative sources. The airline spends about $3 billion a year on jet fuel.

”While we are still in the early stages of this project, the possibilities are exciting. We hope to announce further details soon,” a spokeswoman, Olivia Wirth, said.

Solena formed a joint venture with British Airways in February to build a £200 million ($305 million) plant in London by 2014 to turn up to 500,000 tonnes of waste a year into 73 million litres of jet fuel. This would be enough to fuel about 2 per cent of BA’s aircraft based at London’s Heathrow Airport.

Qantas said it was too early to say what a waste-based fuel plant would cost but it is likely to reach into the hundreds of millions of dollars. It is also talking to other companies about its options for biofuel.

The airline’s chief executive, Alan Joyce, is among 18 business leaders who sit on the federal government’s business advisory committee on climate change.

Qantas, Virgin Blue and Air New Zealand are members of the global Sustainable Aviation Fuel Users Group, whose goal is to fast-track the commercialisation of sustainable aviation biofuels.

Air New Zealand has also trialled the use of a blend of jet fuel and jatropha oil in an engine of a Boeing 747-400.

 

This story was found at: http://www.theage.com.au/environment/energy-smart/leftovers-on-the-menu-for-jet-fuel-20110103-19dwo.html

 

Advertisements